Why You Need to Slow Down for a Speed Bump

Some motorists find speed bumps to be a nuisance and just zip right through them without slowing down. If you happen to be one of these people, you could be doing more damage to your car than you realize. Let this be clear: not slowing down for a speed bump will put tremendous wear on your car.

Speed Bumps Destroy Your Shocks

The shocks are responsible for absorbing most of the road’s imperfections. This includes speed bumps as well as pot holes and rocks. The shocks, though, may not be able to absorb the impact of a sudden bump or dip at high speeds. This causes the shocks to bend and shatter, leaving the car with less protection.

Sped Bumps Can Destroy Your Steering

Once your shocks are destroyed, the rest of the car becomes more vulnerable. This includes the steering, which becomes susceptible to vibrations. This, in turn, can cause a leak in the power steering reservoir, damage the steering rack mounts, or throw the wheels out of alignment.

Speed Bumps May Damage Your Exhaust System

The exhaust sits right underneath the car. If you speed past a speed bump, it can cause the car to jump off the road. This leads to the exhaust getting smacked right on the blacktop when the vehicle lands. A damaged exhaust system may result in a failed emissions test.

Speed Bumps Ruin Your Tires

When the car lands forcefully after hitting a speed bump, the impact can cause the tire’s sidewall to make contact with the road. The sidewall is much thinner than the tread and can wear prematurely.

Let Us Correct All of the Above Issues

Chuck’s Auto Repair commonly addresses damage associated with speed bumps, potholes, and bumpy surfaces often associated with Seattle streets. Let us inspect for possible damage and offer necessary auto repairs if you don’t normally slow down for a speed bump.
Edited by Justin Vorhees

Complete Auto Inspection & Repair, Front to Rear

Serving Motorists of Seattle and the Greater Area

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